jellygummies:

If you post any kind art on the internet, you might want have a look at a website called to.be to check if they are making money from your work without your consent.

It’s basically a site that provides tools to make collages, and a marketplace to share them. It also lets people purchase the collages as t-shirts and art prints.

That sounds great so far. But to.be don’t inform their users about copyright and don’t seem to have much appetite to look out for users who post work that isn’t theirs. Finding out that someone is selling my hard work on t-shirts for $40 a time is heartbreaking. 

In this case the user’s work was barely a collage. It’s my pillow sprite, large and in charge, placed over a generic background layer. More or less a textbook example of plagiarism. They told me “your character is only a portion of her work” but you can clearly see that it’s the main event. I didn’t drag that t-shirt template over it either, it went automatically to that position when I clicked ‘print t-shirt’ in the bottom right. They also chose to show my pillow sprite right in the centre of their Instagram photo, proving that my work is the only notable part of this design.

I don’t actually blame the user who uploaded it. I blame to.be for not explaining the difference between original collage work and plagiarism to it’s users. If you are making a collage for sale, you either make sure you have the right to use every single image in that collage, or you make something so far removed from what you started with that it’s a brand new thing in it’s own right. Distort it, cut it up, change the colour, add new parts, change the tone, change the aesthetic, make it your own thing. Don’t just slap my work over a background and call it yours. That’s not only illegal, but it’s extremely lazy.

Thankfully they took my work off their website in the end. A couple of messages to their Instagram account and a couple of emails did the trick.

I am by no means a hugely successful or rich person so this sort of thing always gets to me. If you ever come across my artwork for sale and I haven’t posted it either here or on my portfolio page then please tell me about it.

I’ll even make you a gif or something for your trouble :p 

Lovely work. True words.

patternbase:

We are excited to announce that The Patternbase has been selected to receive a Propeller Fund grant, and that we will be opening a boutique gallery space in Chicago this Spring! (at The Patternbase)

patternbase:

We are excited to announce that The Patternbase has been selected to receive a Propeller Fund grant, and that we will be opening a boutique gallery space in Chicago this Spring! (at The Patternbase)

(Source: howdoyousayy)

Bambi Gang (test pattern) by John Angus
[n.b. Thumper in the bottom right corner of the repeat]

Bambi Gang (test pattern) by John Angus

[n.b. Thumper in the bottom right corner of the repeat]

theories-of:

Noel Dolla, Torchon a pois, 1971, acrylic on cloth

theories-of:

Noel Dolla, Torchon a pois, 1971, acrylic on cloth

new-aesthetic:

Carpets by Faig Ahmed.

These are actual, hand-made carpets

Pillow Sprite and Watermelon Fabric by Sam Lyon (Jelly Gummies)Digital print on cotton

Pillow Sprite and Watermelon Fabric by Sam Lyon (Jelly Gummies)
Digital print on cotton

(Source: etsy.com)

theories-of:

Simon Dybbroe Møller Aperture & Orifice 2014 washed concrete, plastic bags, 50 x 50 x 50 cm - 65 x 44 x 38 cm

The reason I reblog this is a complete mystery.

theories-of:

Simon Dybbroe Møller Aperture & Orifice 2014 washed concrete, plastic bags, 50 x 50 x 50 cm - 65 x 44 x 38 cm

The reason I reblog this is a complete mystery.

The tools of the trade

The tools of the trade

Everything I Touch Turns to Mold by Lisa Anne Auerbach

(Source: lisaanneauerbach.com)

putthison:

Actual Japanese Workwear

Check out these absolutely stunning Japanese firemen coats. Known as Hanten coats, these were worn by Japanese firefighters in the 19th century. At the time, the technology to spray water at a high-enough pressure hadn’t been invented yet, so Japanese men had to fight fires by creating firebreaks downwind. Doing so, however, put them in danger of catching on fire themselves, as hot embers can travel up to a mile. To make their coats more protective, they were continually doused with water. 

The symbols and designs you see are for several things. Some are just for decoration, of course, while some signal the fire crew that the wearer belonged to. Others are lucky symbols or refer to a heroic story, giving the wearer encouragement to be strong and courageous. 

You can see these coats in person (along with many other awesome things) at Shibui, a shop in New York City for Japanese antiques and collectibles. They’re moving at the end of September and are having a sale right now to lighten their load. Select items are discounted by up to 50%, including lots of boro fabrics, which is a kind of heavily patched and mended Japanese textile. You can see examples of boro here.

For those of us outside of NYC, Shibui has a Google+ page you can admire (they’ll take phone orders, if you’re interested). There’s also a book titled Haten and Happi, which is all about traditional Japanese work coats.